Palatial Living in Split

I’ve visited palaces before, from England to Ecuador, so I figured I knew what to expect when I went to Diocletian’s Palace in Split, Croatia. But Roman emperors building themselves retirement homes at the seaside did not mess around. This was not just an imposing building, this was an entire city. Built in the fourth century, the palace originally held Diocletian’s retinue and military guard, and a few centuries later, people moved in and set up shops and homes. It’s been the heart of the city of Split ever since.

Bell tower of the cathedral

Bell tower of the cathedral

One of the imposing walls of the palace

One of the imposing walls of the palace

Gregory of Nin, the 10th-century bishop who introduced Croatian in church services.

Gregory of Nin, the 10th-century bishop who introduced Croatian in church services

As a World Heritage site, the palace has to keep to strict rules of conservation, so the shops and restaurants inside the structure use the same marble from nearby island Brac whenever possible, and the streets are paved with white flagstones. Of course, before UNESCO started making rules about what could and could not stay, the city went through centuries of change. The main structure is still the same one that Diocletian lived in, but since then, nobles installed their coats of arms over doorways, bishops replaced temples with churches and Diocletian’s mausoleum with a basilica, and one religious group even turned part of the city walls into a very narrow Christian chapel.

Chapel in the fortified palace walls

Chapel in the fortified palace walls

Climbing the steep stairs of the bell tower

Climbing the steep stairs of the bell tower

Not a bad view

Not a bad view

The peristyle of Diocletian's Palace

The peristyle of Diocletian’s Palace

I visited Split in June 2013, as part of my two-week journey along the Croatian coast. I had astonishingly good weather the whole two weeks–the kind of warm, sunny weather that intensified the blue water and orange-roofed houses in each town–but one afternoon in Split, I got caught out in a hailstorm. I huddled with some other people on a balcony of the Cathedral of Saint Dominus, then dashed across the peristyle to the dome and listened to a quartet sing a cappella as the rain thundered outside.

View from the top of the bell tower

View from the top of the bell tower

Even the graffiti is educational

Even the graffiti is educational

As I mentioned in another post, I also took a ferry across to the island of Brac, to visit the beach Bol. The beach was stunningly beautiful, but people aren’t kidding when they say that the beaches in Croatia aren’t sandy. Only pebbles in every direction, which made getting in the water more of a hobble than a carefree dash. Once I settled onto my towel, I was able to appreciate the pebbles as a kind of massage bed, but any movement was a little uncomfortable. But maybe it’s just me; I didn’t notice anyone else having any problems. Ah well, small sacrifices.

Bol Beach on the island of Brac

Bol Beach on the island of Brac

Paradise looks like pebbled beaches

Paradise looks like pebbled beaches

View from the hill outside city walls

View from the hill outside city walls

The East Coast Itinerary

I haven’t made it too easy for those of you following along at home to know where I am any given week, oops. Here are some plans: For the next three weeks I’ll be traveling down the eastern coast of Australia by bus. It’s pretty tightly packed, and all the activities are outdoors, so cross your fingers I get better weather than the rain that’s been following me around since Alice Springs.

October 8-9: Magnetic Island
October 10-13: Airlie Beach and Whitsundays
October 14-15: Rainbow Beach
October 16-18: Fraser Island
October 19: Noosa
October 20-24: Byron Bay
October 25-31: Melbourne

Plans include sailing, sleeping on a boat, driving a 4WD on a sand dune, snorkeling, sunbathing, swimming, and generally frolicking on the Sunshine Coast. Exciting stuff!

Fraser Island, the largest sand island in the world

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ACAM: What to Do in Thailand

Today, dearest fellow travelers, a quick look at some things to do and sights to see in Thailand. My many friends who have been there before: what am I missing? Other than the metric ton of street food I plan to eat, of course.

Baby!

Volunteer at the Elephant Nature Park
Elephant rides are popular throughout Southeast Asia, but the elephants usually work in terrible conditions and it’s generally more ethical not to contribute to their ill treatment by paying for rides. Instead, you can pay about $400 for a week of volunteering at the Elephant Nature Park, in the northern part of Thailand, and contribute to the healing of elephants who used to give tourist rides or do backbreaking work in logging operations. Volunteers muck in as needed, helping feed, bathe, and clean up after the elephants. It sounds like an amazing experience.

time to relaaaaax

Relax on the beaches of the western coast
Phuket is probably the most famous resort town in Thailand, partly for the name that Westerners love to mispronounce (it’s really pronounced Poo-KET) and partly for the gorgeous beaches. But also there are monuments to the two sisters who defended the town from invaders through trickery, which sounds pretty excellent.

The Grand Palace in Bangkok

Visit the Grand Palace in Bangkok
It’s a giant palace compound, made up of multiple residences, temples, gardens, and courtyards. The royal family has lived elsewhere since 1925, and now it’s open to the public, so you can wander around for entire days, taking in the exquisite architecture and imaging yourself dancing along to the soundtrack of The King and I. 

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