Where in the World Wednesday

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Lisbon Portugal

Monument to the Discoveries, Lisbon, Portugal; October 16, 2017

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My Top Ten Firsts of the Trip (So Far)

In no particular order:

1. First time driving on the left

Coromandel Peninsula, New Zealand

Coromandel Peninsula, New Zealand

2. First time eating sushi (the real kind, with raw fish)

Kyoto, Japan

Kyoto, Japan

3. First time riding in a tuk-tuk

Chiang Mai, Thailand

Chiang Mai, Thailand

4. First time using crampons

Attaching metal spikes to my feet

Fox Glacier, New Zealand

5. First time drinking sake

Kyoto, Japan

Kyoto, Japan

6. First time riding a motorbike

Phuket, Thailand

Phuket, Thailand

7. First time eating kangaroo and camel

Yulara, Australia

Yulara, Australia

8. First time sailing

Whitsundays, Australia

Whitsundays, Australia

9. First time snorkeling

Kailua Kona, Hawaii

Kailua Kona, Hawaii

10. First time feeding an elephant

Elephant Nature Park, Thailand

Elephant Nature Park, Thailand

Sailing Away in the Whitsundays

When traveling the backpackers’ circuit of the Australian east coast, one of the things one does is sail in the Whitsundays. It’s like taking the waters in Bath or catching a Broadway show in New York—you have to splash out a bit for it, but darling, you simply must. I did not know this was the case until I got to Australia, but I soon learned this was the general opinion, and I did a little research to see if it seemed worth the cost. I got a good deal by booking with the Oz Experience ticket (with the same woman who sent me to Magnetic Island), so then it was just a matter of “will the weather hold?” and “will I get seasick?”

The Condor in the waters of the Whitsundays, off the east coast of Australia

The Condor in the waters of the Whitsundays, off the east coast of Australia

I am pleased to tell you, dearest fellow travelers, that it did hold and I did not feel ill. In fact, what with the wind in my hair and the sun on my face and the water sparkling on all sides, I felt fantastic.  I spent two days and two nights on board a former racing sailboat with four crew and twenty-five fellow tourists. It was one of my favorite experiences in Australia, and I see now why darling, you simply must.

Sail's up, let's go!

Sail’s up, let’s go!

The boat, called the Condor, had won races in its prime, and the crew was fond of mentioning this fact. They had fun taking us along the established route, but it was clear that they all aspired to work on a racing vessel someday. The boat is made of a material that was new at the time—Kevlar, the bulletproof armor cops wear. It’s a heavy steel, and they used a lot of it. Basically, we were all set if we got in a chase with gun-toting pirates.

condor boatHappily, our trip was much more tranquil than that. We boarded in the early afternoon, claimed spots to sleep, and then went back up top to watch the world float by. We didn’t sail for the whole time; in fact, quite a bit of the time, we were motoring to specific destinations. But when we did sail, oh man! The crew could have done it all themselves, but they let us pitch in. Some people pulled on the mainsail and the topsail, and the rest of us furiously turned some machinery to tighten up the rigging. Then we’d be told which side of the boat was safe to be on—called the “upwind” or “windward” side because that was the side tipping up in the air rather than down in the water, based on wind and our position in the water—and we’d hang out there as we sliced through the sea.

A sailor's life for me

A sailor’s life for me

The first day, we sailed to Tongue Bay and put in anchor for the night. Several other boats had the same idea, and as the sun set, the lights from all the boats glowed brightly until the stars came out, and then they were brilliantly outshone. People wandered around the boat, drinking wine, watching a dolphin play in the light off the stern, lying back and stargazing. I bundled up and chatted with a couple friendly women as we stared up at the sky. I wanted to stay there all night, but it eventually became too cold, so we all went down below, and balanced on our little bunks as the ship rocked us to sleep.

We were up bright and early the next day, and after breakfast, we got in the dinghy we’d towed, and we were ferried over to the island nearest us. We went on a short bushwalk up to a lookout point, and voila! Whitehaven Beach spread out below us. This beach has some of the whitest, loveliest sand in the world. It’s 98% silica, so for some time, people took the sand to make glass products with. Now it’s protected, which is a very good thing, because the local rocks don’t have any silica, so the sand probably blew over here years ago and it’s likely more can’t be made. What you see is what you get, here.

Looking down at Whitehaven Beach

Looking down at Whitehaven Beach

whitehaven beachWe walked down to the beach, dumped our things in a central pile, and spread out. Some people went to take jumping photos, the few couples with us wandered off for a romantic stroll, and I walked along the shore looking for stingrays. They float very near the shore, and although it’s hard to tell from my photos, I did see several of them. I walked almost all the way around the point (it was pretty big), and admired the brilliancy of the water, the sky, and the bright white sand. It was like a postcard of paradise had come to life, and just sparkled in the daylight.

Stingray, just floating along

Stingray, just floating along

Once we were back on the boat, we raised anchor and made our way toward Luncheon Bay. On the way, appropriately, we had lunch, and we watched the crew feed sea eagles. Once we got to the bay, we donned our stinger suits (because Australia is always trying to kill you) and grabbed snorkels and goggles. The dinghy took us close to the shore of this island, from which you can see the smallest lighthouse in Australia. Once we got to the reef, the crewmember cut the engine and we all fell with purpose straight into the water.

The reef here was the same Great Barrier Reef that I’d seen up in Cairns—it is 1,600 miles long, after all—but I preferred snorkeling in Cairns. The water was cloudier here, and there were way more people in the water with me. Also, importantly, the crew hadn’t briefed us on how to safely be near coral here, as they had in Cairns. I saw a man stand on coral while he adjusted his goggles. I told him he couldn’t do that, that he was causing irreparable damage to the reef, and he just looked annoyed with me. That’s why the crew needs to say these things, so they’ll get taken seriously and thus help protect the reef we’re all admiring.

The deck of the ship

The deck of the ship

After our snorkel, we sailed around to Langford Sandbar. The dinghy took us out to the sandbar, which only had one other large group, as well as a few couples who were probably highly annoyed at the intrusion. We brought nachos that the crew had made, and snacked on those while the sun started to set. (I say nachos, but please understand that these in no way resembled nachos that you might find in the United States, other than the base of tortilla chips and the addition of some sort of cheese. Still, they were fairly tasty.) We took some group photos and raised a glass of wine as the sun set.

sunset whitsundaysThat night was a party night. It’s a strange thing to drink a bit too much wine on a boat in the ocean. You still feel expansive and invulnerable, but a little less so, since two thin wires around the edge of the boat are all that keep you from falling into the black water and the nocturnal sharks therein. So we stayed in the middle of the boat and bonded over drinking games I haven’t played since college.

I may have tried to get a dance party going.

I may have tried to get a dance party going.

The next day some people did a morning snorkel, but others of us read and sunbathed in the already fierce morning light. Soon it was time to raise anchor for the last time, and the crew got excited because the wind was up in just the direction they wanted it. We set the sails and all sat upwind side, and only just in time, because that wind was strong. I hadn’t actually had a chance to fling my legs over the side, so for a good portion of the sail back I was bracing myself between something holding coiled rope and a rail bracing another length of rope, which was scary because the boat must have been at least at a 45 degree angle, and if I let go of either my hand or my foothold, I’d go straight down the boat and into the water.

Bracing myself against this for a good 30 minutes

Bracing myself against this for a good 30 minutes

Once I did get more securely settled, though, it was pure bliss. All we heard was the wind whipping the sails, the waves slapping the boat, and passengers occasionally screaming as the spray flew high. I felt free and peaceful. I can see how people structure their whole lives around this feeling.

Blissful

Blissful

I walked around with the sea sloshing about in my head for the next few days, and I was a bit shaky on my feet for a little bit, but I didn’t care. I even had to doze on an all-night bus ride that night rather than sleep in a proper bed, and I wasn’t bothered. I had sailed, and darling, I simply must do it again.

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Where in the World Wednesday

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It’s the triumphant return of Where in the World Wednesday! Since blogging in real time isn’t going as I expected (as in, I haven’t even finished the first week of Hawaii and here I am six weeks into the trip), I thought it’d be good to set up some weekly photos to keep you interested.

Langford Sand Bar sunset, Whitsunday Islands, Australia, October 12, 2012

A Sailor’s Life for Me?

I’ve traveled by plane, train, and automobile. I’ve taken taxis, subways, horseback rides, and the English Channel ferry. But I’ve never traveled by sailboat or large ship, and I think this trip might be the time to start.

Luxury liner

Now someday Heather will convince the rest of us in the family to join her on a cruise, and that will be fun. But in the meantime, it’s possible to travel by large ship with a little less glamour but just as much comfort. You can hitch a ride with a cargo ship. When I first heard about this mode of transport, I envisioned rattling around in a vast ship full of container boxes, peeking my head out from below deck occasionally.

But the reality is much nicer: you pay for a room with its own bathroom, you dine in the officers’ mess, and there’s usually even a swimming pool on board. It actually sounds like the perfect way for me to travel; there are no more than 10 other passengers on the ship (since if there are 12 or more, they’re required to pay to have a doctor on board), and the crew is all busy with sailing the ship and looking after the cargo, which means little need to socialize and lots of time to kick back and relax. Of course, it’s more expensive to travel by ship than it is by air, because it takes many days as opposed to many hours. But the slower pace, and the endless ocean views, are appealing.

the sailing life

The other boating method popular among travelers is sailing. You can join up as part of a crew and work for passage, or you can pay a certain amount per day and sail as a passenger. I’ve been on a sailboat all of once in my life–although that was in the little harbor of a Greek island, not bad–so I’m not sure any crew would hire me on. I’m also not entirely convinced of my abilities if they did let me on, but maybe I’d be a fast learner whose muscles would be much stronger than expected? But sailing as a passenger, chipping in with cooking, rocking to sleep on the waves… I could do that.

Anyone have sailing experience and access to a sailboat this summer? Want to show me the ropes? (Ooh, I bet that’s where that phrase came from.)

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